My Historical Romance titled “Von tadellosem Ruf” is now available!

A merry romance set in Regency-England …

It is an unforeseen blow for Lady Linfield when her nephew Robert Rothleigh, the black sheep of the family, inherits the title of Lord Cavenham. Robert is infamous for having caused anything from gossip to scandal, and Lady Linfield had always wished him as far away as possible.

Immediate action is required to save the family’s standing and clear Robert’s reputation when he becomes the head of the family:

  • a marriage to a suitable wife of high moral standards,
  • the settlement of his debts,
  • and a handsome apanage.

All this Lady Linfield will take care of. But what if the chosen bride, Georgina Standon, has different ideas about her future? And will Robert comply for the first time in his life?

Soon, Georgina and Robert are embroiled in a swirl of incidents and misconception. The theft of a valuable necklace and an abduction put additional obstructions in their way towards a happy ending.

… for readers enjoying the novels of Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer

Read an excerpt here.

„Von tadellosem Ruf“ is available in major Online-Shops in print and as e-book (ISBN: 9783744854313). The novel is written in German.

Look Forward to August: New Non-Fiction Books about the Georgian Age

Each month at Regency Explorer, I provide Regency Enthusiasts with a summary of new non-fiction books about the Georgian Age. Art, Literature and Travelling are prevalent topics in August, but if you are interested in the (often rather dark) history of the East India Company or are fascinated by the rake of the 18th century, read on, there might be new reads for you.

Which is your favourite new release of August? Choose from 22 titles: Continue reading

When Less is Truly More: Designing a Cover for a Novel

Looks matter: It’s the cover that makes a potential reader stop and browse a book in a store. As writing and editing my historical romance is finished, the next challenge is to design a compelling cover. No easy task!

I started with jotting down ideas. The cover should:

  • indicate the historical period, i.e. the late 18th century
  • provide the reader with some ideas about the story
  • match the genre of romantic love story
  • have a serene and elegant air

So many wishes, but could they be combined in one cover? Continue reading

Wellington: A Hero, His Earnings, and His Score on the Marriage Market

It’s a truth universally acknowledged that a man in regimentals strongly appeals to the fair sex. When he is also famous, his favour with the ladies rises. However, it is his income that makes him a desirable husband, as the novels of Jane Austen point out.

How would national icon Arthur Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington, have fared on the marriage market? Was he as sought after as Jane Austen’s Mr. Darcy – or even more popular? Find out here.

 

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Unique Fans Related to Historic Events of the 18th Century

Hand-held fans of the 18th century were more than an accessory. They often commemorated political milestones, were a display of loyalty and patriotism, and celebrated popular social and scientific events.

For this post, I have compiled 8 fans related to historic events of the 18th century for you. Enjoy the beauty and singularity of the objects, and marvel at the craftsmanship.

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Writer’s Travel Guide: The British Tourist and Napoleonic Milan

In this post:

  • How to get to Milan in the 18th century
  • Where to stay
  • Dangers and annoyances
  • Napoleonic sight-seeing in Milan

Travelling to Italy had always strongly appealed to the British aristocracy. Milan had been a favourite since Maria Theresia, sovereign of the Holy Roman Empire, remodelled the city in the second half of the 18th century: Milan featured lovely public gardens, and the fabulous opera house La Scala. But Alas!, visiting this splendid city came to a halt for British travellers from 1796 to 1814, when Napoleon had occupied Milan and most parts of Northern Italy. It was only after the Battle of Waterloo that British tourists could visit Milan again. One of the most famous tourists was Lord Byron, who spent two weeks in Milan in October 1816.

Lord Byron had always been an admirer of Napoleon. In Milan, he was lucky to get acquainted with the French poet Stendhal (Henri Beyle by real name). Stendal had been a secretary to Napoleon. Byron and Stendal met almost every evening for several weeks, and Byron questioned Stendal about his hero.

Some British tourists took a special interest in seeing the places of Napoleon’s power. Thus, locations connected with Napoleon became a curiosity for tourists. I have selected some of them for you in this post. Find out more about Napoleonic Milan: Continue reading

Robert Adam’s Bumpy Career Start

When budding star-architect Robert Adam returned from his Grand Tour in 1758, he needed to find clients for the glamorous style he had developed in Italy. He knew that only the very rich would be able to pay for the grandeur he designed. Thus, he and his brothers settled close to High Society. They set up their home first at St. James’s Place, then at Lower Grosvenor Street in London. It was most important for Robert to be regarded as a gentleman architect rather than a professional architect, as he feared that being the latter would lower his status to a mere craftsmen. Robert displayed the many sketches he had made in Italy in his home, while the drawing office was located at New Bond Street, ‘invisible’ for his clients.

It was difficult for the ambitious Adam brothers to find their first commissions. Aristocrats who hadn’t mind Robert’s company abroad in Italy weren’t willing to socialise with him in snobbish London. Eventually, two women were instrumental in starting the Adam brothers’ career.  Continue reading

How to Dress for a Picnic with Emma – New Exhibition at the MOC

I have a great treat waiting for me this year: “Picnic with Emma”, a historical dance. The theme is of course based on “Emma”, the novel by Jane Austen, published in 1815. It refers to the picnic at Box Hill that heroine Emma attends with her friends and neighbours:

“They had a very fine day for Box Hill … Nothing was wanting but to be happy when they got there. Seven miles were travelled in expectation of enjoyment, and every body had a burst of admiration on first arriving.”

Picnics first evolved in early nineteenth century Britain. They were regarded as a fashionable social entertainment, and each participant contributed a share of the provisions, to be enjoyed together.

Though a picnic was the pleasurable pursuit of the leisured people, it means that the participants were dressed for an outdoor activity not for an elaborate indoors assembly as a ball. Ladies would wear walking dresses and gentlemen would be seen in riding habits.

No ball gowns for the historical dance! Bad news for my red lace empire-style dress: It will have to stay at home. So I need a new costume, fitting the period and an Austenque picnic. Making one will be fun!

 What to wear for a picnic in 1815? Continue reading